About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
FBC 6
CSPAN 5
CNBC 4
LINKTV 3
MSNBCW 3
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
CSPAN2 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WRC 1
LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
down the iron curtain and changing the entry into the eu of those countries that lost so many of their use to communism. and contained in this history is the crucial point about britain, about our national character, about our attitude to europe. britain is characterized not just by its independence but above all, by its openness. we have always been a country that reaches out that turns its face to the world that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. this is britain today, as it's always been. independent, yes, but open, too. i never want us to pull up the drawbridge and retreat from the world. i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe, too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants, and should want, to play a committed and active part. now, some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the mi
$2.6 million a day. that is a lot of money. discussions will continue. $67 million from the eu. japan will pledge $120 million -- japan will pledge and money for humanitarian needs. >> that is an important aspect. thank you very much. passenger plane has crashed near kazakhstan. local media are reporting at least 20 people died when the aircraft came down in bed at weather. thousands of protesters have ignored a curfew imposed by the egyptian president. the opposition has refused the call for talks. have more -- we have more. >> was violence on the anniversary of one of the bloodiest days of the revolution. teargas covered downtown cairo with plumes of smoke. .hey've not held back a general was held hostage. these angry young men and women -- the opposition blocked -- the national front had six specific demands starting with the formation of a government and cancelling all the consequences of the desperation. >> was urged to stand his ground. >> no person or front has the power to force anything on the elected president. nobody should be able to implement any agendas or conditions for
around the world. social democrats take control of the house and the eu is forced out of power in lower saxony. plus, optimism by the u.s. as republicans attempt to break the budget stalemate in congress. investors pulling back in japan as the boj begins its two-day meeting that's widely expected to back more easing and a new 2% inflation target. >>> and heavy snow bringing travel across northern europe. hundreds of flights canceled here in the uk. france and germany, too, with disruptions expected to continue for several days. >> yes. welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. he will be back later in the week from davos and along with plenty of other people and a lot of great guests. it's a three-hour program. the first three hours, i think the third you'll have to flip over to cnbc to catch. we will be heading out to washington as the capital prepares for the inauguration of president barack obama. but will he spend the next four years at the mercy of republicans? we'll explore that. plus, we'll assess if israel could be medicining for a right coalition as benjamin netan
minister david cameron made a critical speech on the uk's rocky relationship with the eu. cameron proposed a bold referendum to allow british voters to decide whether or not to exit the alliance by 2016. >> there's no doubt we're more powerful than washington, delhi because we're a powerful player inside the union that matters for british jobs, and security. it matters to our ability to get things done in the world. it matters to the united states and other friends around the world, which is why many tell us clearly they want britain to remain in the european union. if we left the european union, it would be a one-way ticket, not a return. >>> let's take an early look at the markets. we'll get all up in your business this morning. steve sedgwick is live in london, which is still at this hour firmly part of the european union. >> and set to be for a bit longer. there was a huge caveat to what david cameron said there in that sound bite. he wants more competition in europe, more accountability, better growth and wants us to get out of the eurozone debt crisis. he wants to renegotiate with eu
a strong u.k. and a strong e.u. so i'm wondering what the white house makes of the announcement today that there will be a referendum on that issue and what the united states has at stake in the u.k. staying part of the e.u. >> we welcome the prime minister's call for britain to remain in the e.u. and to retain a leading role in europe's institutions and as the president told the prime minister when they spoke last week, the united states values a strong united kingdom and a strong european union. we value our central relationship with the u.k. as well as our relationship with the european union which makes critical contributions to peace, prosperity and security in europe and around the world. we believe that the united kingdom is stronger as a result of its european union's membership and we believe the european union is stronger as a result of having the united kingdom in the e.u. so that's -- our views on this are very clear. the internal process by which these matters are considered within the u.k. or any other country are obviously the province of those countries and those gover
that climate change may be happening. we don't know to what degree, and, you know, the e.u. wants to spend $250 billion, but it only movedded the needle lower on the temperature by one degree fahrenheit. the point being is what's the best way to go about this? do we just throw money at the problem when you have big companies like ge and morgan stanley, you know, at the table, ready to benefit from it, or do you do what the utilities are doing, methane, carbon capture. >> a multiprongedded approach. at the end of the day, we can want afford to be on the wrong side of history on this or live life in the short term. this is an absolute concern. at the end of the day, face it, the market is worth $6 trillion. we want a piece of that in america. liz: what do you think? >> we do, but now is not the right time. we have to get the market back to creating jobs, talking less than 150,000 on a monthly basis, 8% unemployment, and the government needs to redistrict focuses to get the economy back online rather than focusing on clean energy right now. liz: phil, is north korea and iran or climate change the
points to 26%. across the e.u., some 26 million people were out of work. wall street was down again today as the market marked time, waiting for corporate earnings announcements. the dow jones industrial average lost 55 points to close under 13,329. the nasdaq fell seven points to close below 3092. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we return to the u.s. consulate attack in benghazi, the only known suspect held in connection with the incident was released today in tunisia. his attorney said he was freed because of a lack of evidence. the attack, which killed u.s. ambassador to libya christopher stevens and three other americans was seen by large crowds and captured on security cameras, but the culprits have remained elusive. libyan witnesses have reportedly placed a local leader from the militant group ansar al-sharia, at the scene of the attacks. he survived a vigilante assassination attempt this week and remains at large. for more on the status of the investigation, i'm joined by nancy yousef of mcclatchy newspapers. welcome nancy. what do we know ab
military efforts. >> of the eu have expressed their solidarity, both with mali and the intervention of france. all of my colleagues, without exception, have highlighted the full support the actions of friends and are thankful that france reacted so quickly. to quote the remarks of one of them, "witho, france, there would have been no mali." >> mali gained independence from france in 1960. more than 100 people have reportedly been stabbed, shot, or potentially burned to death by a massacre in the syrian city of homes. the attack in a poor area of the city's edge killed 106 people, some of them children, according to the britain-based syrian observatory for human rights. many homes were set on fire and some of the victims' bodies appeared to have been burned. it was unclear whether the attackers were part of the syrian army or members of a militia loyal to president bashar al-assad. widespread violence was reported thursday across syria, with continued bombings by government planes and clashes between troops and anti-government rebels. the obama administration is continuing its push
don't know to what degree and, you know the e.u. wants to spend $250 billion but it only movedded the needle lower on the temperature by one degree fahrenheit. the point being is what's the best way to go about this? do we just throw money at the problem when you have big companies like ge and morgan stanley, you know, at the table ready to benefit from it or do you do what the utilities are doing, methane carbon capture. >> a multiprongedded approach. at the end of the day we can want afford to be on the wrong side of history on this or live life in the short term. this is an absolute concern. at the end of the day, face it the market is worth $6 trillion. we want a piece of that in america. liz: what do you think? >> we do but now is not the right time. we have to get the market back to creating jobs talking less than 150,000 on a monthly basis 8% unemployment, and the government needs to redistrict focuses to get the economy back online rather than focusing on clean energy right now. liz: phil is north k
by the eu, the judge has been sanctioned by the eu. bill: he has a tough, tough reputation too this judge has, and the trial just startek. and his wife is on record as saying that everything that is coming out of there this week is a flat-out lie. what is the motivation beyond iranian media putting this word out, when in fact it's not the case. you're saying now this guy is still in jail, he's behind bars. >> he's in jail, he's facing abuse while he's in prison. and the iranian regime, the revolutionary garcia is trying to utilize the internal media to in order to tamper down any kind of global outreach that is going on media wise. what the iranians are doing through their media is no, no, no we are letting him out in a few days. meanwhile they are beating him. bill: torture. >> this is one of the worst prisons, eye rain and prisons. the media is utilizing a distortion campaign. it's called media advocacy. we are putting up the true facts, iran is distorting it to tamper down media significant in what is becoming a dangerous by the moment situation for the pastor and his family. he's 32 y
the thing that differentiates the u.s. from so many of the other countries especially in the eu we know how to fix our problem, and we're just at lagerheads as to which way to go. >> reporter: but the head of the international monetary fund christine lagarde said here "the u.s. has to confront this." if those decisions are postponed again -- >> well it will be pushing the can down the road again which was the reproach that we made against the europeans and i don't think that the u.s. should fall in that trap. >> reporter: and with the u.s. economy now showing renewed strength, the feeling here is that the u.s. could help pull up the rest of the world, if washington could just get out of the way. charlie, norah? >> anthony mason thank you. >>> in the international press institute reports that 132 journalists were killed around the world last year and reporting on the war in syria is especially dangerous for westerners. more than two months ago american freelance correspondent james foley was abducted by armed gunmen and hasn't been heard from since. he's a friend of o
. 89 senators voted for it. he voted against it. a letter to the eu asking the eu to designate hezbollah a terrorist organization. 88 senators signed it. he was one of the ones who didn't. when there was a letter to russia asking to deal with the rising tide of anti-semitism in russia. 99 senators signed the letter, one did not, chuck hagel. he has the right to have those interviews but there is a bipartisan consensus in washington illustrated by the math outside it. the question is why does the president want that in the discussion? why does he want that person with those judgments running the pentagon at this time? those are important questions to be explored during the hearing. >> he should have the opportunity to answer that. he has made clear on matters that impact israel the most in a positive way, i would not have been on the side of senator hagel in those votes, important to answer it and important to look at his entire record. on the things that matter most with u.s. policy and our great ally, israel, he has been as responsible as any when it comes to financial support
british voters to decide whether or not they should exit the eu by 2017. cameron argued for continued membership but in a more streamlined european union with fewer restrictive regulations. >> from our parade of papers, "the omaha world herald," the governor of nebraska has given the okay for the keystone pipeline to run through his state effectively leaving the decision now of whether or not to green-light the 1700-mile project to the obama administration. the president has pushed back a decision on the project until after march, but the pipeline's future remains in doubt as president obama rejected a plan a year ago, you'll recall, saying the legislation didn't give enough time for the government to give it a thorough review. >> and you know, michael steele, we were talking this morning about how the republicans move forward in a more thoughtful, strategic way. still being tough. >> yeah. >> you can be tough. you can be conservative. you can still be smart. >> be smart. that's right. >> we haven't been smart. a guy who has been smart, chris christie. new quinnipiac poll numbers out
cameron speaking this morning. does that have any impact on your business? >> it does in a way. because u.s./eu trade is the one trade agreement that the u.s. has not done. that the europeans desperately need to get done. >> right. so the uk being part of that yes or no i would venture to say our government is going to have a lot to stay about the uk staying part of the eu i think as has been indicated. >> did you catch any of the comments about tax avoidance, sort of global tax avoidance issue? >> no, i did not. i'll stay quiet on that one. >> the other big topic here, energy. >> yes. >> and in particular, the u.s. energy situation, shale, fracking, et cetera, you bullish, you bearish, where do you think we really are? i mean people have prognosticated for now awhile that we were going to get there but doesn't seem like we're there. >> andrew, i think it is the bull case for the world. so to answer your question, i'm billish. and i think it's a game changer. and i think it is probably the story of global economic recovery if handled right. and frankly, the beneficiaries of that will be the u.s
that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was i think it makes a big difference. i think it matters a great deal at the american people get the truth. i think they have the right to be told the
is referring to lee university singers who hail from the eu -- lee university in tennessee. next is a call from john. john is a naperville, illinois. an independent there. caller: i really enjoyed the inaugural program. in particular, president obama saying we need not choose between those who brought us where we are today and those who stand for where we will be in the future. then i have a question. what is the history behind the flags displayed in front of the white house? host: the white house or the capital? caller: the capital. host: there is information about the flags, which i can get for you, but not immediately. let's listen to a call from iran in georgia. you are on. republican. welcome. caller: i watched the first inauguration and thought it was wonderful. host: today the ceremonies? 2008? caller: the first inauguration he had. my main comments i wanted to make is being a republican, i am almost ashamed to say that. i did vote democratic, and i voted for president obama. the reason i did vote for him is because we need change and things to go on and start getting these people togeth
a departure from the e.u. reme we ng about that, but some kind of modification. they have more financial transactions to tax than anybody else in europe. i mean, france and germany can say they have no problem with it. that's because they don't have that many of them. so that's why. >> you know, michelle, the big story may be whether or not "downtown abbey's" finances are being mismanaged. >> if they reduce the number of seasons because of that, that would be terrible. >> i knew that would get you. thank you, michelle. >>> let's get a check on energy and commodities. >> hey, from europe to asia, we're looking at japan as a key driver in the commodities markets today. of course the bank of japan stimulus plans, something that's helping many commodities including gold and the fact we may see inflation down the road for gold. and we're finding them above the 16 90 level. it looks like it could be a doubtful case for gold to continue its gold run. that something that citi is looking at its inability to sustain above the $1,800 level. that may weigh on the bullish case for gold. that's accord
total of all of your votes refusing to sign a letter to the eu, asking has a lot to be designated as a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, being one of two to vote against sanctions this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you have made about palestinians and the jewish lobby -- all of that together, that the image you have created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as terrorist organizations. >> if there was a vote on the floor of the senate this afternoon to label the iranian national -- revolutionary guard, the people that killed soldiers in iraq, some of the most vicious people to the people of iran themselves, if there was a vote would you still vote no? >> i would want to know from the president what they were doing. ask i mean you read the paper, you w
sessions already with our eu partners on doing exactly that. one interesting aspect you raised is those have not necessarily included the private sector or the critical infrastructure sectors. expanding the aperture to do that would make sense. >> in our last few minutes, thank you offer very important questions. secretary naplitano, as the content your future -- as you think about your future and some of the unfinished business, what is your highest priority? >> i think when i look at where i will be spending my time, aside from the management integration type issues, i think the coming immigration debate is something that we will be deeply involved in. we have deep and wide experience in those issues. cyber, we have already mentioned. then the constantly evolving types of terrorists threats and hamdi can better educate ourselves -- and how we can better educate ourselves, trained law enforcement, ascertain from history and otherwise what are better ways to identify behavior's indicate -- in take up potential violence, those are the things that concern me -- ways to identify and behavi
versus the dollar. and you can see right now, the dollar is stronger against the eu euro. gold prices are down by about 6.30, $1675.30 an ounce. right now, let's get to the global markets report. ross westgate is standing by in london. good morning. we haven't seen you in quite a while. you have a lot of red behind you this morning. >> we have, indeed, becky. i saw andrew more recently than i've seen you over there in davos. yeah, look, we are down. you can see decleaners outpacing the decliners. we're down at the session low. down around .0. the spanish market down 1.5%. that's down to bank stocks. they're all off heavily because of santander. santander is europe's largest lender in the eurozone. stock off 2.3% today. there's 2012 net profit more than halved hurt by big losses in real estate, write-downs and property assets. also key growth spots as latin america down, as well. they're setting aside another 18 billion or 19 billion euros for provisions in 2012. they said they may still sell some more addette az. there's a lot of restructuring going on, as well. the market has been fo
marseille. >> also croatia, you say, is a sought after travel destination. >> joining the eu in 2013. another good reason to go. over 1,200 islands. definitely go inland to the national park which has 16 interlinking lakes and waterfalls, great for treking and boating. >> sounds beautiful. if you want to go south, go to central america. you also think nicaragua will become more competitive. i heard it's like the new eco tourist place to go, right? >> new coasta costa rica. it has the same beaches, wonderful surf. it's got rain forests like costa rica, monkeys, volcanos, you name t it's unspoiled at the moment. >> is it safe there now to go? >> yes. granada. >> you say a good time to go there is april through november shall. >> exactly. >> kate maxwell, always great to have you here. happy new year once again. >> happy new year to you. >> we're heading into "today's" kitchen for a light new year's day brunch with donatella. what's that? oooh. very interesting. cool. i like "success." joy. i got cracker chips. [ laughing ] chocolatey pretzel. mmmm.... special k! [ female announcer ] s
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)